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Posts Tagged ‘dorado’

A couple weeks ago I made a repeat trip up to the upper Rio Parana (which happens to have the best dorado fishing in Argentina imho) with Tom McMurray & Brandon White from Marine Ventures Foundation, a non-profit fisheries conservation foundation.  They were interested in investigating Argentina’s native fish species, namely the golden dorado, in order to document what issues surround the fishery and what, if any, conservation measures are being taken. After talking w/ the locals and various stake holders in the area, we discovered that fisheries “management” or “conservation” or whatever you want to call it, is actually rather progressive in this part of Argentina. Despite the utter lack of scientific knowledge on dorado populations, officials largely realize the economic value dorado provide in the form of sport fishing and tourism, and want to preserve the resource. In fact, killing a dorado is now illegal in both the Corrientes province of Argentina and across the river in Paraguay. Nonetheless, the region is acutely impoverished and many locals break the rules and poach fish just to make ends meat. But at least the attitudes of the decision makers at the top of the pyramid seem to be oriented in the right direction. Perhaps our fisheries stakeholders could learn a thing or to from them.. But enough of fishing politics. We did manage to fit some actual fishing too!

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Here’s some photos kindly sent to us by Pinti in Repeski on the Rio Parana. Can’t wait to go back!

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Here’s a couple photos I wanted to share that our friend Peto sent me earlier this summer. The giant catfish is a highly-prized Surubi. Peto is a down to earth, die hard fly fishing guide, knows the Rio Parana like the back of his hand, and speaks more languages than I can count on one hand. Can’t wait to go fishing with him again!

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Reyes Del Rio

This is absolutely Bad Ass:

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Just an update. We’ve been in the Amazon rainforest of Bolivia a few weeks ago, scouting and checking the fishing conditions before our first season starts up in August.

The Secure River is a pristine clear water stream, where the freshwater dorado lives in the Amazon basin. It’s a unique blend of this extremely powerful species and Amazon species like the Yatorana (one of the strongest freshwater fishes in South America) and the Pirapitinga (a pacu specie). Both of these are fished sight casting and run like torpedoes.
On this trip it was the first time that our team had entered and scouted the Agua Negra stream (means black water), a small tributary of the headwaters of Secure River. It’s a small stream, with incredible clear water that flows from Andes Mountains. The more upstream we went the more run-pool pocket system the stream was. Then we finally understood the reason for the name of this stream. The more we reached the upper parts with the Indian canoes; huge schools of sabalos (a common baitfish) were running everywhere and turned literally the clear water dark by their sheer numbers.
The place is truly, totally wild… Jaguar, Tapir and small deer’s footprints everywhere announced that there aren’t alone. Pure Jungle.
The Pirapitinga is one the biggest challenges on these waters. They are very spooky, and we stalk carefully to spot fish on pools and then sight casting, it’s necessary a very good presentation. When done properly the follow is made with no doubts and the following fight is very exciting. These powerful, round bodied fish with bulldog jaws fight incredibly strongly, and almost always get into your backing with a series of long, determined runs.
Fishing with 6/7 weight rods, sight casting for Pirapitingas with 12-17 pound line and Dorados ranging 8-26 pounds once again prooved that this area is the newest and most exciting door to be opened in fly fishing.  During the expedition we floated the Secure River from the first lodge (in construction) to the Oromomo Indian community. This float trip gave us numerous options and Dorado was present all long the way down in very good average sizes. Casting to the fallen trees and runs provided certain action. Wading and sight casting in crystal clear waters for some of the most sporting freshwater species in the world… what more could you want?

For more info about this trip please contact us at info@farawayflyfishing.com

Thanks to Rodrigo Salles for the photos and the update.

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